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Meals on Wheels

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Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve

// Book Review //

Thank you to Scholastic Press for this complimentary review copy!

“It was a dark, blustery afternoon in spring, and the city of London was chasing a small mining town across the dried-out bed of the old North Sea.” It isn’t often that the first words in a book begin in the middle of a fervent chase, however Mortal Engines wastes no time in setting the pace for this fantastical story. Thousands of years after the world as we know it ends, surviving cities and towns roam the earth on the sea, in the sky, and most notably - on wheels. The feared city of London grows tired of hunting small towns for resources and longs for more suitable prey. In the event that led to the earth’s intense shift, the most highly advanced technology of the old era was lost to time… until London learns of a top-secret “old tech” weapon capable of restoring them to their former glory. The daunting race gets rolling between the feared towering city and a group of improbable intercontinental friends for the control of the future.

There are a number of areas that Phillip Reeves knocks out of the park in Mortal Engines, such as the elegiac painting it creates of our altered world and the descriptive scenery along the way. The protagonists of the story travel long distances throughout the book, and while the story never seems aimless it remains easy to appreciate how sizable the traveled world feels. Another highlight of the book for myself was that it at no point felt predictable. The story is so inherently unique and the character’s roles so unfamilliar that they make for an undeniable rollercoaster from start to finish. With today’s release of the cinematic take on this book, I recommend to anyone interested in this captivating story to read the book first. While I expect the movie to be a stunning visual depiction of events in the book, I can not confidently assume the movie will build the stories depth quite as thoroughly as the book in the readers mind. Mortal Engines is a sometimes fierce, sometimes silly book that is always fun.

Book Details:

Title: Mortal Engines

Author: Philip Reeve

Publisher: Scholastic Press

Format: Paperback

ISBN:  978-1338201123

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You'll Want to Add This Book to Your Library!

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Red Sky at Night by Elly MacKay

// Book Review //

Thank you to Tundra Books for this beautiful, complimentary review copy!

I am so excited to share this book with you! I have been recently posting a variety of children’s books that make great gifts and this book is a delectable treat that you will want to enjoy over and over again! If you already know Elly MacKay’s work you know the wonder and whimsy of her creations. If you are not familiar with Elly MacKay’s art, I am so excited to introduce you to her stunning photography!

Elly creates tiny little treasures from paper, arranges her paper creations in a paper theatre, creatively adds light and then beautifully photographs the stage she has set. The final product is a gorgeous photo that has a feel of magnificent water color creation! Elly’s incredible art is featured on the cover for the Tundra Books paperback editions of the Anne of Green Gables series, Emily of New Moon series and other Montgomery titles including Mistress Pat, The Golden Road, The Story Girl, Jane of Lantern Hill and The Blue Castle.

While Red Sky at Night is a visual dream, the reader will want to slowly meander through the pages while soaking up the delightful details, it is also an interesting compilation of weather folklore. I remember when I was a child, my grandfather used to say phrases such as “Red sky at night, sailor’s delight”. At the end of the book, Elly includes a list of the weather-related phrases mentioned in the story along with an explanation on what they mean and whether or not they are true.

Red Sky at Night is a perfect combination of interesting text accompanied by stunning illustrations! I am confident that you will want to add this beauty to your home library!

Book Details:

Title: Red Sky at Night

Author: Elly MacKay

Illustrator: Elly MacKay

Publisher: Tundra Books

Format: Hardbound

ISBN:  9781101917831

 The end papers in  Red Sky at Night  are stunning!

The end papers in Red Sky at Night are stunning!

 Weather is such an interesting topic for children to talk about!

Weather is such an interesting topic for children to talk about!

 Adorable!

Adorable!

 The clouds do look like woolly fleece!

The clouds do look like woolly fleece!

 I only knew a saying or two before I read this book. My understanding of weather folklore has now significantly increased!

I only knew a saying or two before I read this book. My understanding of weather folklore has now significantly increased!

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If A Horse Had Words

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If A Horse Had Words by Kelly Cooper and Lucy Eldridge

// Book Review //

Thank you to Tundra Books for sending me this beautiful, complimentary review copy!

I believe a great children’s book meets at least two important criteria. First, the book must tell a story that captures a child’s imagination and interest. Second, and equally if not more important, a great children’s book carries a positive message that is reinforced through the story’s development.

‘If A Horse Had Words’ demonstrates through the narrative the importance of being kind to animals. Although animals can’t speak like we do, they have feelings and need to be treated kindly. I love how the little boy in this story rescues a baby horse from harm, handles the horse gently and then meets him again at a later time. My only regret is that the horse was sent away and I wish he would have been allowed to stay with the boy. Yet, despite their separation, the horse remembers the boy’s kindness in the end. Treating animals with kindness and respect is such an important trait to teach our children!

If A Horse Had Words is also beautifully illustrated! Take a look below at the gorgeous illustrations on the cover, end papers and through the story!

Book Details:

Title: If A Horse Had Words

Author: Kelly Cooper

Illustrator: Lucy Eldridge

Publisher: Tundra Books

Format: Hardbound with dust jacket

ISBN:  9781101918722

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Anything is Possible!

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Petra by Marianna Coppo

// Book Review //

Thank you to Tundra Books for this beautiful, complimentary review copy.

Petra is a rock star… both in the literal and figurative sense. This children’s picture book features adorable illustrations and a big, powerful message! The reader follows Petra, a rock, through a variety of life experiences that are both charming and engaging. My favorite part about this book is the two-fold message it communicates: “Never give up” and “You can be anything you want to be”!! I will be giving Petra as a gift to the little ones in my life!

Congratulations to Marianna Coppo and Tundra Books! Petra is a nominee for both the 2018 GoodReads Choice Award and the 2019 Kate Greenaway Medal.

Book Details:

Title: Petra

Author: Marianna Coppo

Illustrator: Marianna Coppo

Publisher: Tundra Books

Format: Hardbound with dust jacket

ISBN: ISBN 9780735262676

 “I am strong. I’m a fearsome, fearless, mighty, magnificent mountain.” -  Petra

“I am strong. I’m a fearsome, fearless, mighty, magnificent mountain.” - Petra

 “But what an amazing island I am! What paradise! What palm trees, that peace, what sunshine, what…” - Petra

“But what an amazing island I am! What paradise! What palm trees, that peace, what sunshine, what…” -Petra

 Isn’t she just the cutest rock!! :-)

Isn’t she just the cutest rock!! :-)

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The Magical Delights of Childhood

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The Toymakers by Robert Dinsdale

// Book Review //

In the simplest of words, I loved this book! I tied it with a red bow to present it as a gift of wonder and magic if you choose to read it. Now I will attempt to tell you why I gush over this book without revealing the plot as I want you to explore and experience the beauty and heartache as it unfolds on the page.

Robert Dinsdale writes as if he is painting a masterpiece and lighting a scene with exquisite, atmospheric and delightful prose. It’s as if the reader can see, touch, taste and smell the details surrounding them. Those who walk into The Emporium (including us as readers) are treated to a magical display of wonder and enchantment. Throughout this story, Dinsdale weaves themes of family bonds, sibling rivalries, pressure to conform to societal expectations, sacrifice, the wonder and innocence of childhood, giving, hope, grief and love. The horrendous impact of war to both the soldiers engaged and the loved ones left at home is poignantly addressed in real terms. The magical elements in The Toymakers are reminiscent of The Night Circus yet both stories, in my humble opinion, are unique, well-crafted adventures

Although this book is not a Christmas story, the holiday season is the perfect time of year to pick it up! If you choose to read it, let me know what you think. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

Do you like stories that have elements that are unreal but still have a relevant application to “real” life or do you prefer stories that are grounded in the real world? I would love to hear your thoughts


A Handful of My Favorite Quotes:

“Help wanted:
Are you lost?
Are you afraid?
Are you a child at heart?
So are we.”
- The Toymakers, Robert Dinsdale

”His letters grew long, he was writing in the thick of night, and the passion with which he wrote was evident in the way his pen pressed against the page.” - The Toymakers, Robert Dinsdale

“A secret has been revealed, and finally I understand the true meaning of toys, something my papa learnt long before me. When you are young, what you want out of toys is to feel grown-up. You play with toys and cast yourself as an adult, and imagine life the way it’s going to be. Yet, when you are grown, that changes now, what you want out of toys is to feel young again. You want to be back there, in a place that did not harm nor hurt you, in a pocket of time built out of memory and love. You want things in miniature, where they can better be understood: battles, and houses, picnic baskets and sailing boats too.” - The Toymakers, Robert Dinsdale

“‘Oh Papa,’ said Martha, ‘he lived a life...’” - The Toymakers, Robert Dinsdale

“Once upon a time, all of us, no matter what we've grown up to do or who we've grown up to be, were little boys and girls, happy with nothing more than bouncing a ball against a wall.”- The Toymakers, Robert Dinsdale 


Robert Dinsdale on the magic powers of toys

The article below, written by Robert Dinsdale, is quoted from and can be found at this link: https://www.penguin.co.uk/articles/2018/robert-dinsdale-magic-of-toys/

“There is a thing you understand when you see children playing: kindness is instinctive; malice is not.

I don’t think enough of us know this. I certainly didn’t. We live in a world which constantly – and sometimes, it seems, gleefully – bombards us with the terrible things human beings do to each other, and the repercussions of these were once the places to which my writing took me: damaged people, getting on with life as best they can; soldiers returned from war to find the war wasn’t out there at all, that it was in them all along; the human heart in constant battle with itself.

Then, in 2013, my daughter was born – and everything, fiction included, changed.

You learn a lot by becoming a parent for the first time. There’s the pragmatic – how do you hold a child? how do you feed one? how do you have a shower or go to the toilet or eat a meal when there’s a child attached to you twenty-four hours a day? – but there’s the indefinable other stuff too. The stuff that seems too clichéd to put in print. That unconditional love exists. That parental love has a different register to any you’ve experienced before. But among all these revelations, the one that affected me most, and which lies at the heart of my new novel The Toymakers, was this: kindness is instinctive – and, though some of us will lose that instinct in our lives, once upon a time it was central to us all.

Among the many and varied moments that changed the way I think, not only about fiction but about the big starry mysteries of life itself, one in particular sticks in mind. In 2015, my daughter not yet 18 months old, I pottered with her in a suburban toyshop, looking for a gift for a friend, and becoming increasingly dismayed at the shelves filled with cheap, ugly trinkets. Who, I thought, would really want those mass-produced pigs perched on their bedroom shelves? Who could bear to hold a teddy that looked so… malignant? Then I looked down. My daughter had picked a flimsy plastic figurine from the shelf and was turning it in her hands – and I believed I had never seen a look of such happiness on another human being’s face. What I had dismissed as tawdry and knock-off, she understood was magic itself. Moments later, a harassed mother stopped beside me in the aisle to look over some other toy. My daughter reached out and deposited the figurine in the lap of the boy in the neighbouring buggy. His face was alight, the same as my daughter’s. The magic had been passed on.

And so was born The Toymakers: a novel dredged up from the bottom of a long forgotten toybox; a novel about a family of extraordinary toymakers who could capture this feeling and crystallise it, fashioning it into magical toys of their own; and a novel in which, slowly but surely, the magic we all experience in childhood begins to pale as the hard, bitter business of growing up takes hold.

When I was in the middle of writing The Toymakers, lost down some narrative back-alley with toy soldiers marching me even further into the dark, I caught up with an old friend for a long overdue drink. His mother had passed away some time before, and now his father had followed after, and it had fallen to my friend to empty the old family home, to take itineraries of their lives and itemise his own. Every object was a memory in that old house: the crockery on which they once ate their family dinners, still sitting in the cupboards where it had always been; the familiar stains in the carpet, or loose fabric on the sofas on which they all used to sit. But, for my friend, nothing was more powerful than climbing the ladder into his family attic and unearthing the boxes where the books and toys of his childhood were safely stowed away in boxes, perfectly preserved. And it’s this bittersweet feeling of remembering that lies at the heart of the magic of Papa Jack’s Emporium. For my friend, rolling the dice from a moth-eaten board-game, uncovering the head of the rocking horse that once sat in the corner of his room, slotting back together the joints of a decrepit toy race track, felt like holy things. They washed away the more recent memories of death and divorce that had been his family life. They restored the love he had felt back then – but more powerful yet, they restored the love he had himself given. To discover that there was once a time when he could love an inanimate object so fiercely that it still echoed in him, an adult man, thirty years later, had moved my friend beyond measure. To know we still have the ability for simple, un-thought-through love is the most powerful thing.

And perhaps that’s the nature of the longing I myself feel when, on my own rare trips into the childhood attic, I catch sight of the dinosaurs, the patchwork dog on wheels, the dolls and cars and building bricks in whose company I spent so much of my earliest years. Like the plastic figurine my daughter had clung onto that day, these things are worth nothing to the world. But the love we pour into them, the time and imagination we invest turning them into real, life things, makes them worth everything to us.

We all grow up. We all grow old. Every day we spend living is a day further away from the childhoods in which we had that pure, unfiltered, un-nuanced ability to love. Every day there are new experiences to crowd out the old, new stories being written in our histories, new memories obscuring the earliest we made. But our toys are childhood crystallised. To me they are more powerful than old photographs, more powerful than old flavours and scents. They have the power to transport us back to the strange, half-formed creatures we used to be, in an age before life taught us to beware, to be suspicious, to build hard, protective shells around ourselves in order to survive. To hold a toy from your childhood is to remember what that was like. As Papa Jack tells his sons in The Toymakers: everyone was once a child, no matter what they’ve done or who they’ve grown up to be. And in a reactionary world, where daily we fling bile at each other online, where too many of us hate our neighbours because of the colour of their skin, the gods they worship, or the place they were born, this seems to me the most important lesson of all.”


Book Details:

Title: The Toymakers

Author: Robert Dinsdale

Publisher: Penguin Random House UK

Format: Hardbound

ISBN: 978-1785036347

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